Salmonella Litigation

A resource for Salmonella Outbreak Legal Cases sponsored by Marler Clark

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Fresh produce like tomatoes can be contaminated with Salmonella

Because the physical characteristics of different types of produce vary, the risks of Salmonella contamination vary from one type of fresh produce to the next. Leafy greens, tomatoes, cantaloupe, sprouts, and orange juice have all been associated with Salmonella outbreaks.

Produce can become contaminated with Salmonella in a number of ways. Contaminated farm equipment can transfer Salmonella to produce if it comes into direct contact with raw untreated manure, untreated compost, contaminated water, animals that shed Salmonella in their feces, or with people who somehow become contaminated. Fresh produce exposed to flood waters that carry Salmonella can become contaminated pre-harvest. Runoff water that could potentially carry Salmonella should be diverted from fields growing fresh produce and should not be used for irrigation.

Fresh produce fields in rural areas next to wetlands or wildlands are particularly susceptible to exposure by wild animals such as deer and wild boars that harbor Salmonella and other pathogenic bacteria. Domestic animals and livestock that make their way into fields can also contaminate fresh produce, as can field workers who are shedding Salmonella in their stool if they do not use proper hand-washing techniques, or if proper toilet facilities are not available to them in the fields where they work.

In 2012, mangoes imported from Mexico were the source of a Salmonella outbreak that resulted in at least 121 illnesses in 15 states. Most of the Salmonella outbreak victims were from California. During the outbreak investigation, public health officials determined that the Daniella brand mangoes had been imported from Mexico. Shortly after the Salmonella outbreak, mangoes were deemed a high risk food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. See Daniella Mango Salmonella Lawsuits & Litigation

Cantaloupes have been commonly associated with Salmonella outbreaks. In 2011 and 2012, cantaloupes were determined to be the source of Salmonella outbreaks. In the 2012 incident, the Salmonella outbreak was traced to cantaloupes grown in Indiana by Chamberlain Farms. In the 2011 incident, the Salmonella outbreak was traced to cantaloupes imported from Guatemala by Del Monte. See Chamberlain Farms Cantaloupe Salmonella LawsuitsDel Monte Fresh Produce Cantaloupe Salmonella Lawsuits

Alfalfa sprouts produced by Tiny Greens Organic Farm and sold at Jimmy John’s restaurant locations across the country were the source of a multi-state Salmonella serotype I 4,[5],12:i:- outbreak between November 1, 2010 and February 9, 2011. At least 140 people became ill with Salmonella infections during the outbreak. During the sprout trace-back investigation, FDA collected both product and environmental samples from Tiny Greens Organic Farm of Urbana, Illinois. One environmental (water run-off) sample yielded Salmonella serotype I 4,[5],12:i:- that was indistinguishable from the outbreak strain by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). See Jimmy John’s/Tiny Green Alfalfa Sprouts Salmonella Lawsuits & Litigation

In December of 2010, sprouts were again the source of a Salmonella outbreak among Jimmy John’s restaurant customers. This outbreak was traced to alfalfa sprouts sold by Sprouters Northwest, which also sold Salmonella-contaminated sprouts to retail outlets. See Jimmy John’s/Sprouters Northwest Salmonella Lawsuits & Litigation

Between April and August of 2009, the CDC worked with state, local, and tribal public health officials to determine the source of a Salmonlla Saintpaul outbreak that was ultimately traced to jalapeno and Serrano peppers sold at Wal-Mart and distributed by Frontera Produce. At least 286 people out of 1442 who were counted as part of the Salmonella outbreak were hospitalized. See Wal-Mart and Frontera Produce Salmonella Jalapeno Pepper Outbreak Lawsuit

In April of 2008, tomatoes were thought to be the source of a Salmonella outbreak. As investigators from the CDC, state, local, and tribal health agencies interviewed case-patients about foods they had consumed in the days prior to becoming ill, they learned that jalapeno and Serrano peppers grown in Mexico and sold at Wal-Mart stores were the source of the Salmonella outbreak. By the end of the outbreak, CDC reported that 1442 people had become infected with Salmonella Saintpaul after eating contaminated jalapeno and Serrano peppers, and indicated that tomatoes may have been an additional source of infection at the beginning of the outbreak. At least 286 people were hospitalized with Salmonella Saintpaul infections during this outbreak, and two people’s deaths may have been caused by their Salmonella infections. During the outbreak investigation, jalapeno and Serrano peppers, and water from a farm in Mexico where the peppers were grown, tested positive for the outbreak strain of Salmonella Saintpaul. See Wal-Mart Salmonella Jalapeno and Serrano Pepper Outbreak.

Orange juice and cantaloupe can be contaminated with Salmonella

In 2005, orange juice produced by the Orchid Island Juice Company of Florida was identified as the source of a Salmonella Typhimurium outbreak investigated by the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) and several other state health departments. A probe of the Salmonella outbreak by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), CDC, and state public health agencies led to the discovery that unpasteurized orange juice produced by Orchid Island tested positive for both the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Saintpaul. The product had been distributed in at least 30 states and 3 countries; 72 Salmonella outbreak-cases were reported. See Orchid Island Juice Co. Salmonella Outbreak Lawsuits.

  • Chamberlain Farms Cantaloupe Salmonella Lawsuits

    Marler Clark filed 3 lawsuits against Chamberlain Farms on behalf of victims of a 2012 Salmonella outbreak traced to the farm’s cantaloupes.  The law firm is pursuing claims on behalf of additional victims of the Salmonella outbreak.  At least 270 people nationwide were diagnosed with Salmonella infection after consuming cantaloupe grown by Chamberlain Farms, including 101 who were hospitalized and 3 who died. 

  • Chia Seed Salmonella Outbreak

    Marler Clark has filed multiple lawsuits against the manufacturer of the chia powder.  Between January and July 2014, public health officials in the United States and Canada investigated an outbreak of Salmonella linked to consumption of organic sprouted chia seeds or chia powder.  The initial outbreak investigation used PulseNet data to identify a cluster of 12 persons infected with a strain of Salmonella Newport that had never been seen before in PulseNet. Through a collaborative investigation with the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified a second cluster of patients with a strain of Salmonella Hartford also not seen previously in PulseNet. A third serotype isolated in patients, Salmonella Oranienburg, was also suspected of being associated with chia powder. Canadian public health officials identified a fourth serotype in outbreak associated patients, Salmonella Stainpaul.  A fifth serotype, Salmonella Saintpaul, was isolated in patients in Canada but not in the United States.

  • CW Sprouts/Caudill Seed Salmonella Lawsuits

    Marler Clark’s Salmonella lawyers filed lawsuits on behalf of 10 victims of a 2009 Salmonella outbreak that was traced to the consumption of contaminated alfalfa sprouts grown from seeds sold by Caudill Seed Company of Kentucky. All claims have been successfully resolved.

  • Daniella Mango Salmonella Lawsuits & Litigation

    Marler Clark filed a Salmonella lawsuit against Splendid Products, distributor of Salmonella-contaminated Daniella mangoes, in September of 2012.  The law firm represents victims of a 15-state Salmonella Braenderup outbreak that was traced to Daniela brand mangoes after 121 people who had eaten or been exposed to the mangoes became ill with Salmonella infections.

  • Del Monte Fresh Produce Cantaloupe Salmonella Lawsuits

    Marler Clark Salmonella lawyers represented a Colorado family whose 12-year-old daughter was hospitalized after eating Salmonella contaminated Del Monte brand cantaloupe. On March 31, 2011 the family filed a Salmonella lawsuit against Del Monte in Colorado. 

  • Harmony Farms Salmonella Outbreak Litigation

    Harmony Farms alfalfa sprouts were linked to a Salmonella outbreak in Oregon and Washington in March of 2003. A second outbreak linked to Harmony farms occurred in November, 2003.  Marler Clark’s Salmonella lawyers represented victims of both outbreaks in claims against Harmony Farms.

  • Jewel Osco Salmonella Outbreak

    In June 2104 Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) and the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) investigated an outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium among persons who had consumed chicken or deli products from Jewel Osco, a grocery store located in Tinley Park, Illinois.  In total 19 case patients were identified.  Fourteen patients were laboratory confirmed with Salmonella Typhimurium, five patients were considered to be “probable” cases. Dates of illness onset ranged from May 9 to June 11. Two additional case-patients who were laboratory confirmed with Salmonella Typhimurium were identified with symptom on June 15 and June 25. They both had exposure to a previously identified household member will illness associated with this outbreak. Eight outbreaks associated case patients required hospitalization and three others visited their physician’s office.

    Marler Clark has filed three lawsuits.

  • Jimmy John’s - Sprouters Northwest Lawsuits and Litigation

    Marler Clark filed two lawsuits against Sprouters Northwest on behalf of victims of a Salmonella outbreak in the Northwest.  The law firm represented Washington and Oregon residents who became ill with Salmonella infections after eating contaminated clover sprouts sold by Sprouters Northwest. The claims have been successfully resolved.

  • Jimmy Johns - Tiny Greens Salmonella Lawsuits and Litigation

    Marler Clark represented a number of victims of Salmonella poisoning that resulted from eating contaminated sprouts from a Jimmy John’s restaurant in Illinois. In Januarty 2011, the firm filed a Salmonella lawsuit on behalf of one of the many people nationwide who have been made ill from consuming Jimmy John’s sandwiches. All claims have been successfully resolved.

  • Orchid Island Juice Co. Salmonella Outbreak Lawsuits

    The Salmonella lawyers with Marler Clark represented several people, mostly children, in claims against Orchid Island, the company whose orange juice was identified as the source of a Salmonella outbreak in 2005.

  • Quizno’s Salmonella Outbreak Lawsuit

    Marler Clark represents a woman who became ill with a Salmonella Typhimurium infection after eating contaminated tomatoes served in food-items at the Rochester, Minnesota, Quizno’s restaurant in early October of 2007.  The Minnesota Department of Health and Olmsted County Public Health Services investigated the outbreak and identified 23 cases of Salmonella among patrons and employees of the restaurant; 18 were culture-confirmed, and one person was hospitalized for two days.  All cases ate food prepared at the restaurant between October 1 and October 8, 2007. 

  • Sheetz Salmonella Outbreak Litigation

    Marler Clark’s Salmonella lawyers represented over 100 people who became ill with Salmonella infections after eating at Sheetz convenience stores.  The Sheetz Salmonella outbreak was traced to tomatoes supplied to Sheetz by Coronet Foods of Wheeling, West Virginia.

  • Sun Orchard Orange Juice Class Action Salmonella Lawsuit

    The Marler Clark lawyers represented 55 people who became ill with Salmonella infections after drinking Sun Orchard unpasteurized orange juice.  The lawsuit was filed on behalf of all people who became ill with Salmonella infections after consuming the orange juice in 1999.

  • Susie Cantaloupe Salmonella Lawsuit

    Marler Clark represented an 85-year-old Washington resident who was hospitalized for 18 days with a Salmonella infection after eating Susie brand cantaloupe in 2002. The cantaloupe, which had been imported and distributed in the United States and Canada by the I. Kunik Company of McAllen, Texas, was recalled for Salmonella contamination, but public health investigators identified 58 cases of Salmonella Poona associated with the consumption of Susie brand cantaloupe before the outbreak was over.  Salmonella cases associated with the outbreak were found in Arkansas, British Columbia, California, Colorado, Manitoba, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, Ontario, Oregon, Saskatchewan, Texas, Vermont, and Washington. 

  • Wal-Mart and Frontera Produce Salmonella Jalapeno Pepper Outbreak Lawsuit

    More than 1400 people in 43 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada were part of a Salmonella Saintpaul outbreak traced to Mexican-grown jalapeno and Serrano peppers in 2008. Marler Clark filed a lawsuit on behalf of multiple people who were sickened in the outbreak. All Salmonella claims related to this outbreak have been resolved.